Пособие по Intonation Practice



Abbreviations

HH

High Level Head

StH

Gradually Descending Stepping Head

HF

High Fall

HPr

High Prehead

LWR/LWR

Low Rise/Low Wide Rise

MF/MWF

Mid Fall/Mid Wide Fall

FR

Fall Rise

RF

Rise Fall

MWR

Mid Wide Rise

HNF

High Narrow Fall

GREETINGS & FAREWELLS

In this Chapter the following speech patterns will be used (turn attention to their intonation):

Speech Patterns

Intonation Patterns (typical)

How do you do?

(HH) + Fall

Hello.

HPr+LWR or HH+Fall

Good morning.

Good afternoon.

Good evening.

Cheerio.

HPr+LWR

Bye-bye.

Goodbye.

Goodnight.

See you tomorrow.

(HH)+MWF, FR

See you later.

See you!

Listen carefully to the audio supplement. Repeat the corresponding phrases or provide your own responses when necessary. Do your best to imitate the intonation patterns used.

Be ready to provide your comments regarding the area of usage of the above-mentioned speech patterns.

Intone the following dialogue (try to imitate the intonation you hear) and prepare its good reading:

Hello. Lyford 4242?

Oh, hello. Could I speak to Harriet, please?

It’s Harriet speaking.

Hello, Harriet. It’s David here.

Hello, David. I didn’t recognize your voice.

I didn’t recognize yours, either. It’s a bad line.

Answer the following questions (your answers can be used for drawing up the summary) and provide your examples:

What greeting shall be used if you meet someone for the first time? Is it a question? What response is expected?

What intonation patterns are typical for greetings?

What is the typical intonation of farewells?

Are there any formal and informal greetings/farewells?

Do we use the expression ‘See you…’ in formal situations?

Learn more:

Hello (also hullo especially in BrE) (BrE also hallo) is the most usual word and is used in all situations, including answering the telephone or when you want to attract sb’s attention: Hello John, how are you? • Hello, is there anybody there? • Say hello to Liz for me. • They exchanged hellos (= said hello to each other) and forced smiles.

(BrE) used to show that you are surprised by sth: Hello, hello, what’s going on here?

(informal) used to show that you think sb has said sth stupid or is not paying attention: Hello? You didn’t really mean that, did you? • Hello! Did you even listen?

Hi is more informal and is now very common.

How are you? or How are you doing? (very informal) often follow Hello and Hi: ‘Hello, Mark.’ ‘Oh, hi, Kathy! How are you?’

Good morning is often used by members of a family or people who work together when they see each other for the first time in the day. It can also be used in formal situations and on the telephone. In informal speech, people may just say Morning.

Good afternoon and Good evening are much less common. In informal use people often just say Afternoon or Evening.

Good night is not used to greet somebody, but only to say goodbye late in the evening or when you are going to bed. In informal use people often just say Night.

If you are meeting someone for the first time, you can say Pleased to meet you or Nice to meet you (less formal). Some people use How do you do? in formal situations. The correct reply to this is How do you do?

Draw up the summary of this chapter.

THANKS & APOLOGIES

In this Chapter the following speech patterns will be used (turn attention to their intonation):

Speech Patterns

Intonation Patterns (typical)

Thank you.

MWF

Thanks.

MWF/FR

Thanks very much (indeed).

Not at all.

(HH)+MWF

Yes, please.

FR

No, thank you.

No, thanks.

Sorry.

FR Unit

Sorry I’m late.

FR Divided

That’s all right.

HPr/HH+LWR

I should think so too.

HH+Fall

I’m afraid I can’t.

(HH)+Mid Fall

Excuse me.

FR

Hey!

HF

Listen carefully to the audio supplement. Repeat the corresponding phrases or provide your own responses when necessary. Do your best to imitate the intonation patterns used.

Be ready to provide your comments regarding the area of usage of the above-mentioned speech patterns.

Intone the following dialogues (try to imitate the intonation you hear) and prepare their good reading:

D’you sell garden tools, please?

I’m afraid we can’t help you, sir.

Any idea where I should try?

What about Cook’s in the Market Place?

That’s an idea. I’ll go down there now. Many thanks.

Well, I’m sorry we can’t help you.

That’s quite all right. Cheerio.

Where is the station? Can you find it on your map, Alan?

No, I can’t. Let’s ask someone.

What about that man across the road. He might know.

Good idea. Excuse me! Excuse me. Could you tell me the way to the station, please?

I’m sorry. I’m a stranger here myself.

Oh. Thanks very much all the same.

Hey! That girl running in front of us: she’s just dropped something. Excuse me!!!

No. She didn’t hear…Hey! It’s a railway ticket. I’ll put it in my pocket.

Come on. We can catch her if we run…Hey!! Excuse me! You’ve dropped this!

What’s that? Oh! Oh, my ticket! I’m most grateful!

We called you just back there, but you didn’t hear.

Well, I was hurrying to catch a train, but I think I’ve missed it anyway. I’ll get the next one.

So you’re going to the station? What luck!

We’re going there, too, but we couldn’t find it.

Oh, it’s not far from here. Well, I’m glad I can help you. You’ve certainly helped me.

Answer the following questions (your answers can be used for drawing up the summary) and provide your examples:

What speech patterns are used to express gratitude?

What can you say if you don’t want to sound too formal?

What speech pattern is used in response to expressions of gratitude?

What speech patterns are used in response to offers?

What do you say if you want to apologize?

What speech patterns are used as replies to apologies?

What is another way of saying ‘sorry’?

What do you say to get someone’s attention?

Learn more:

I’m sorry

1) used when you are apologizing for sth: I’m sorry, I forgot. • Oh, I’m sorry. Have I taken the one you wanted? • I’m sorry. I can’t make it tomorrow.

2) used for disagreeing with sb or politely saying ‘no’: I’m sorry, I don’t agree. • I’m sorry, I’d rather you didn’t go.

3) used for introducing bad news: I’m sorry to have to tell you you’ve failed.

Excuse me

1) used to politely get sb’s attention, especially sb you do not know: Excuse me, is this the way to the station?

2) used to politely ask sb to move so that you can get past them: Excuse me, could you let me through?

3) used to say that you are sorry for interrupting sb or behaving in a slightly rude way: Guy sneezed loudly. ‘Excuse me,’ he said.

4) used to disagree politely with sb: Excuse me, but I don’t think that’s true.

5) used to politely tell sb that you are going to leave or talk to sb else: ‘Excuse me for a moment,’ she said and left the room.

6) (especially NAmE) used to say sorry for pushing sb or doing sth wrong: Oh, excuse me. I didn’t see you there.

7) excuse me? (NAmE) used when you did not hear what sb said and you want them to repeat it

Hey

1) used to attract sb’s attention or to express interest, surprise or anger: Hey, can I just ask you something? • Hey, leave my things alone!

2) used to show that you do not really care about sth or that you think it is not important: That’s the third time I’ve been late this week — but hey! — who’s counting?

Draw up the summary of this chapter.

CONGRATULATIONS, SYMPATHY & SURPRISE

In this Chapter the following speech patterns will be used (turn attention to their intonation):

Speech Patterns

Intonation Patterns (typical)

Really?

MWR

Never!

RF

You failed it. • Is it? • Can’t we?…

(HPr)+MWR/LWR

Well done.

HH/HPr+H(M)WF

Good for you.

HH+H(M)WF

I’m sorry to hear that.

FR Unit/Divided

That is bad luck.

RF

Oh, dear!

HH+MWF

Listen carefully to the audio supplement. Repeat the corresponding phrases or provide your own responses when necessary. Do your best to imitate the intonation patterns used.

Be ready to provide your comments regarding the area of usage of the above-mentioned speech patterns.

Intone the following dialogue (try to imitate the intonation you hear) and prepare its good reading:

There’s a new language school in Oxford, Jo!

Really?

But you won’t believe the name. It’s called the Hippopotamus School of English!

Never!

I wanted a job there, but I didn’t get it!

Oh, dear. That is bad luck.

But my sister applied, and she got it!

Good for her!

Answer the following questions (your answers can be used for drawing up the summary) and provide your examples:

What speech patterns are used to express surprise?

What speech patterns are used for congratulations?

What speech patterns are used to express sympathy?

What do we usually start a sympathetic answer with?

Draw up the summary of this chapter.

REASSURANCES

In this Chapter the following speech patterns will be used (turn attention to their intonation):



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